The Golf Blog: Video highlights of Tiger Woods’ third round 67 at Masters

mulligan, 14 April 2019, Comments Off on The Golf Blog: Video highlights of Tiger Woods’ third round 67 at Masters
Categories: Uncategorized

The Golf Blog says: Tiger Woods is in prime position to win his 15th major. Can he close on Sunday? Francesco Molinari has played steady since last year!



Tiger Woods shoots 67, 2 shots behind leader Molinari at Masters

mulligan, 14 April 2019, Comments Off on Tiger Woods shoots 67, 2 shots behind leader Molinari at Masters
Categories: Uncategorized

The Golf Blog says: Tiger Woods had a vintage masterful performance on Saturday at the Masters to finish -11, only 2 shots behind leader Francesco Molinari.

Leaderboard after 3rd round
-13 Molinari
-11 Woods, Finau
-10 Koepka
-9 Simpson, Poulter,
-8 Kuchar, Harding, Schauffele, Oosthuizen, Johnson, D.
-7 Fowler, Scott

Tiger Woods hasn’t won at the Masters since 2005, and hasn’t won a major since 2008 (U.S. Open at Torrey Pines). Can Tiger close the deal today? Let’s remember that Tiger finished 2d place (behind Koepka at the PGA Championship) and 5th place at The Open Championship after momentarily capturing the lead on Sunday, the first time he held the lead on Sunday at a major in a decade.

Will this Sunday be different? Perhaps. Due to weather, the Masters is starting early in the morning, with split tees off 1 and 10 and threesomes. That means Tiger will be in the final group with Molinari and Finau. Tiger in the final group at a majors has worked well in the past, and so has this colarless red shirt at the Masters:



The Golf Blog: Tiger Woods wins 80th victory — is the chase to beat Jack Nicklaus’s 18 majors back on?

mulligan, 24 September 2018, Comments Off on The Golf Blog: Tiger Woods wins 80th victory — is the chase to beat Jack Nicklaus’s 18 majors back on?
Categories: Uncategorized

The Golf Blog says: Tiger Woods won the Tour Championship by 2 shots, playing a conservative final round (+1) that ensured his first PGA Tour victory in 5 years. The scene on the 18th at East Lake Golf Course should have sent chills up the spine of every golf fan. It was electric. Tiger barely missed out on winning the entire FedEx Cup, which was won by Justin Rose, who birdied the 18th to secure the overall title.

But Sunday was the day, not for Rose, but Tiger. He’s back. After contending in the final round at both the Open Championship and PGA Championship this year, we have to return to the question that we thought had been put to bed: Is Tiger’s quest to beat Jack Nicklaus’s 18 majors back on?

Short answer: yes. But Tiger will be 43 years old next year. By that age, Jack had reached 17 majors, with his last coming at the historic 1986 Masters. So Tiger is effectively 3-majors behind Jack’s pace. Also, keep in mind: only 2 players above age 40 have won 1 major in the U.S. in the past 80 majors. Phil Mickelson won the Open Championship at age 43, but that’s the last major he has won.

Of course, Tiger Woods is in a different league, at least historically. He has one true rival: Jack Nicklaus for the title of GOAT. Tiger has a better chance now to make a final run at Jack’s record, but, as Brooks Koepka has shown, Tiger will have to beat competition that is now younger, stronger, and who hit it longer than he does. The glass is both half full, and half empty, for Tiger at soon to be age 43.



The Golf Blog: Is the glass half full or half empty for Tiger Woods at the major?

mulligan, 13 August 2018, Comments Off on The Golf Blog: Is the glass half full or half empty for Tiger Woods at the major?
Categories: Uncategorized

The Golf Blog says: After Adam Scott bogeyed the final hole, Tiger Woods finished solo second at the PGA Championship, just 2 shots back of the winner Brooks Koepka, aka Hercules. Tiger put on a courageous, spectacular show on Sunday, shooting 6-under 64. It was his lowest round on Sunday at a major. Many commentators, including Nick Faldo, think Tiger will win another major, given his performance at the Open and the PGA Championships. So are you on board, too? We lay out the case for why you should and shouldn’t be.

Glass half-full

1. Tiger Woods was in contention on Sunday at the last two majors, tied for the lead or one shot back in the back nine.

2. Tiger Woods’ new putter seems to be creating some new magic. Tiger had 23 putts on Sunday at the PGA.

3. Tiger Woods’ short game is back to being incredible. No more yips.

4. Tiger Woods’ determination and focus are unmatched.

Glass half-empty
1. Tiger Woods will be 43 years old at the next major, The Masters. (Phil Mickelson did win the Open at 43, and, of course, Jack Nicklaus, the Masters, at 46.)

2. Tiger Woods’ driver continues to bedevil him. It’s a huge problem that has only become bigger, given that Brook Koepka and other young players are bombing it off the tee with decent accuracy. Former swing coach Hank Haney (in)famously described Tiger’s fear with the driver in the book “The Big Miss.” In the book, published back in 2012, Haney suggests that Tiger’s problem with the driver is also mental, and it may be unsolvable to fix. On Sunday at the PGA, it certainly looked that way. When Tiger needed a birdie or even eagle on 17, he blocked his drive right nearly into the water. The reason why Tiger scored on Sunday was his incredible short-iron and short game, plus only 23 putts!! It was Seve-like. But you can’t expect to play like Seve and win majors today.

3. Tiger Woods had numerous surgeries. His back seems to be holding up this year. But how long can he depend on having his body hold up?

4. Tiger Woods hasn’t won a major since 2008. The longest Jack Nicklaus went without winning a major is 6 years, from 1980 to 1986 (when Jack won his last major).

5. The competition is younger, stronger, and better than in 2000. Brooks Koepka, Jordan Spieth, Dustin Johnson, Rory McIlroy, Justin Thomas, Jason Day, etc.

6. The golf equipment has made golf courses set up for long distances at the majors (except for the Open), more often favoring the big hitters. This hurts Tiger because his driver is not reliable (see No. 2 above).




Email: thegolfblog [@] gmail.com

Advertise Here

Archives